The EU sustainable taxonomy and the CO2 Performance Ladder

The purpose of the taxonomy is to establish rules for which economic activities can be considered green - no mean feat. The idea is that it will: make it easier to invest in green activities, shift money to the sustainable economy, minimise greenwashing and increase clarity for all parties.

The Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive and the CO2 Performance Ladder

The Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD) sets new rules for what and how companies must report on sustainability. It covers not only CO2 but also circularity, biodiversity and the rights of workers in the value chain, among other topics. The CSRD will apply to all large companies and listed SMEs - some 50,000 companies across the EU.

The Fit for 55 package and the CO2 Performance Ladder

The Fit for 55 package is the set of measures designed to meet the EU’s 2030 climate goals. Foremost among them is the target is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 55% in 2030 (compared to 1990). The package addresses the EU's climate, industrial, energy, transport and taxation policies, setting specific targets for each sector.

Europe is ready for the CO2 Performance Ladder

Green public procurement (GPP) is developing rapidly across Europe, and the CO2 Performance Ladder can play a large role in boostin those efforts. These are the results of recent research conducted by the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD). Each year, European governments spend €1.8 trillion (14% of EU GDP) buying goods and services from the private sector but there is no requirement to consider the climate in these decisions. Shifting to green public procurement can result in a green revolution among companies and their supply chains, and the CO2 Performance Ladder can help.

18% of Dutch footprint through government procurement

With the 'Netherlands Circular 2050' programme, the government aims to achieve a fully circular economy in the Netherlands by 2050 at the latest. RIVM research now shows that the government can make a significant contribution by sustainable public procurement. 23% of the raw materials needed for our standard of living are purchased through the government.

What are you ready to give up to fight climate change?

The second release of the 2020-2021 EIB climate survey focuses on how people intend to fight clamate change in 2021, what they are willing to give up to tackle the climate crisis, and how the COVID-19 pandemic affects their travel habits and intentions to fight climate change.

The survey finds that if given the choice to give up flying, meat1, new clothes2, video streaming services, or a car to fight climate change, 40% of Europeans would find it easiest to give up flying.